Fußball-Kultclubs in Europa

4 of the most unique football clubs in the world

Photo: Flickr/Tom Brogan

We’ve picked four trendy clubs from around the world that offer a unique form of fandom. Just don’t call them mainstream

FC St. Pauli

With their ardent punk philosophy, FC St. Pauli are one of the most intriguing clubs around, and have spawned fan clubs from Yorkshire to Australia despite languishing in Germany’s 2. Bundesliga. Each match day, supporters descend on Hamburg kitted out in Pauli’s skull-and-crossbones emblem, generating a raucous and anarchic atmosphere. Based near Hamburg’s vibrant Reeperbahn district, the club appeals to fans by taking emphatic stands against racism, homophobia and sexism.

Que sera, sera Whatever will be, will be We're

Que sera, sera Whatever will be, will be We're tweeting for St. Pauli Que sera, sera _____ Follow: twitter.com/fcstpauli_EN #fcsp

FC United of Manchester

When the Glazers took over Manchester United in 2005, many fans wore green and yellow scarves to peacefully express their dismay against the takeover. One set of die-hard supporters took things a step further, though, and created their own club. Being 100% fan-owned, FC United’s fans pride themselves as being against modern football. Unlike the vast majority of 21st century football teams, the club refuses to pay agents and do not bear sponsors on their shirts, either.

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Dulwich Hamlet FC

London has more professional football clubs than any other city in the world. Non-league outfit Dulwich Hamlet FC isn’t one of them, but despite this the pink-and-blue shirted team manages to attract over 3,000 fans for certain matches, thanks in part to its hipster following.

Back in the ‘80s, club supporters staged a grassroots campaign for a new stadium to be built next to proposed supermarket. One local opponent suggested it should be rejected because, from his window, the area “looks like Tuscany”. This objection was overruled, and permission was granted for the new supermarket and stadium at Champion Hill. To this day, Dulwich Hamlet fans sing “Tuscany! Tuscany! We’re the famous Dulwich Hamlet and we look like Tuscany!”

Photo by Joel Virgo (www.joelvirgo.co.uk)

Photo by Joel Virgo (www.joelvirgo.co.uk)

Rayo Vallecano

Based in the Vallecas neighbourhood of Madrid in the shadow of their illustrious city rivals, Rayo Vallecano are the very definition of an obscure, anti-establishment team. In 2009, Rayo’s fans marched through the streets of the Spanish capital in an attempt to get the club’s president to resign, and also boycotted matches to protest against games being played on a Friday night. 

© YouTube // Copa90

Based in the Vallecas neighbourhood of Madrid in the shadow of their illustrious city rivals, Rayo Vallecano are the very definition of an obscure, anti-establishment team. In 2009, Rayo’s fans marched through the streets of the Spanish capital in an attempt to get the club’s president to resign, and also boycotted matches to protest against games being played on a Friday night. 

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08 2016 THE RED BULLETIN

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