Trick Shots

Trick Shots

Words: ruth morgan
Photography: fred murray and rutger pauw

With his new video project, Kaleidoscope, BMX star Kriss Kyle is breaking boundaries. And, if seeing is believing, he’s defying the laws of physics, too

1 LAUNCH PAD

“The idea behind the Kaleidoscope video was to combine never-before-tried tricks with insane optical illusions to create something unique,” says 23-year-old Scottish BMX pro Kriss Kyle, who’s the subject of a documentary available to watch now on Red Bull TV. “I was involved in designing this crazy set from the start. I wanted to incorporate a trampoline, which you can see here. I come up the ramp, do a 180 onto my back, and then bounce off the trampoline to land in a manual, a wheelie. You have to practise to know how it’s going to throw you, but it was great fun.”

Watch the film here 

Trick Shots

Kriss Kyle: “I’m so scared of heights, it’s unbelievable that this was my idea.”

2 LEVEL-HEADED

“There’s no digital trickery here: the levels are held by scaffolding that’s been painted black. And it’s 40 feet high. I’m so scared of heights, it’s unbelievable that this was my idea. I didn’t actually realise how high it would feel. It took a few goes to nail it, and each time was as scary as the last. I had a voice in my head saying, ‘Don’t do it.’ I literally talked to myself out loud and told the voice to shut up. I forced myself through it.”

Trick Shots

Kriss Kyle: “The revolving room was probably one of the hardest, weirdest things I’ve ever ridden in my life.”

3 SPIN CLASS

“The revolving room was probably one of the hardest, weirdest things I’ve ever ridden in my life. I had motion sickness afterwards. It’s got a massive motor, and you should hear the noises that thing makes – it’s so scary being inside it! It’s similar to the one built for the film Inception. My friends at Vision Ramps adapted the idea and built all the other features. They’d done their part and it was up to me to do mine. I’m stoked by the end result.”

4 MAKING MAGIC

“Once we’d figured out the features, we made a mini model of the final set to help me visualise how I’d ride it. And when we finally walked around the full-size set, it was so identical that we felt like we’d been shrunk! There was a team of 40 of us working for 12 hours a day in a Glasgow warehouse to get the project finished. I was bruised and battered by the end, but I’d do it again tomorrow.”

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12 2015 The Red Bulletin

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